Sanitary Bin Regulations

When you own a business, it can be hard to keep track of the regulations while you run it. One question that we’re repeatedly asked is whether a sanitary bin is a legal requirement.

Each state has different waste regulations, some of which do not specifically include sanitary waste, so let’s take a look at each state’s regulations as well as Safe Work Australia’s regualtions and how it affects your business.

What Safe Work Says

The SafeWork Australia document, Managing The Work Environment And Facilities states the following:

“A unisex toilet should include one closet pan, one washbasin and means for disposing of sanitary items. – Toilets should be supplied with: an adequate supply of toilet paper for each toilet handwashing facilities rubbish bins and for female workers, hygienic means to dispose of sanitary items.”

This means that you do need to provide sanitary waste disposal facilities.

Additionally, in order to provide a healthy and hygienic washroom the units must be cleaned, emptied and up kept regularly.

Sanitary bins are the safest and easiest way to allow staff and customers to dispose of sanitary waste. Luckily, having them serviced takes all the hassle out this. You don’t need to worry about disposing of the waste yourself which may be classified as a bio-hazard.

New South Wales

There is no specific legislation in this state relating to sanitary waste, we would recommend following the SafeWorks guidelines stating that female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items. The waste from which must be disposed of in an appropriate way.

Victoria

Female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items. In Victoria, sanitary waste is not deemed clinical waste unless it comes from a place such as a hospital where it is then deemed a bio-hazard. However, EPA Victoria state that sanitary waste must have an appropriate disposal system in place.

Queensland

The Queensland government gives the following guidance:  “It is recommended that premises generating sanitary hygiene waste develop procedures for managing this type of waste which provide clear guidance and information on how to handle, store, transport and dispose of the waste. Large quantities of disposable nappies may cause offence to the public and waste disposal personnel. This should be considered when developing disposal procedures. Correct waste classification and segregation at the source of generation will ensure that waste is properly managed. For the purposes of management and disposal, sanitary hygiene waste from shopping centres, child care centres, family day care, public toilets, restaurants and other facilities whose primary function is not health care related, is not considered to be clinical waste or nightsoil. Also, sanitary hygiene waste, when sourced from aged care facilities and the geriatric and maternity care areas of hospitals, is not considered to be nightsoil.”

Western Australia

As the guidelines are vague, we would recommend following the SafeWork Australia guidelines stating that female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items. Sanitary napkins may not be a clinical waste as it depends on the source of the waste.

South Australia

We found it difficult finding specific regulations surrounding sanitary bins.  We would recommend following the SafeWork Australia guidelines stating that female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items.

ACT

In the Australian Capital Territory, sanitary waste that originates from or has been in contact with a person who may have a transmissible notifiable condition is classified as clinical waste and must be disposed of appropriately. Female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items which is disposed of appropriately. We would recommend following the SafeWork Australia guidelines.

Northern Territory

Northern Territory guidelines are vague. We would recommend following the SafeWork Australia guidelines stating that female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items. These must be disposed of in the proper way.

Tasmania

Sanitary waste is considered clinical waste if it is from people who may be suspected of having communicable diseases or undergoing toxicity drug therapy. It then must be disposed of appropriately. We would also recommend following the SafeWork Australia guidelines stating that female workers should have available an appropriate system for the safe disposal of sanitary items.

Why Sanokil

One reason to chose Sanokil for your services is that we will remain compliant with waste management legislation as it changes. We always keep an eye on any changing legislation surrounding our services. We also take the general hassle out of the physical maintenance of the bins in your washrooms.

On top of this you also get

  • Timely and reliable visits
  • Eco-friendly products
  • Customised quality service
  • Real people guaranteed
  • Everything you need for a great washroom from one supplier

 

Contact us to receive a quote on our sanitary bin or any of our other services. Our customer service team is always ready to answer any questions you may have. Call 1800 992 135, use our contact form or email sales@sanokil.com.au.